The types of IQ tests

In What is Intelligence? And What About IQ?, we gave a brief rundown of what most IQ tests entail, as well as a list of the major IQ tests commonly used. In this article, we will go into detail of each of these named tests.

Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale; Differential Ability Scales; Cognitive Assessment System; Woodcock Johnson III (Test of Cognitive Disabilities); and the Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test.

Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale

This test is designed to assess the intelligence and cognitive abilities of those that are at least two years old. There’s the abbreviated version, which takes 15-20 minutes; and there’s the full version, which takes about 45-75 minutes.

The full version of the test seeks to provide coverage in assessment, by assessing the five factors of intelligence recognized by the Cattell-Horn-Carrol hierarchal model of general intelligence: fluid reasoning; knowledge; quantitative reasoning; visual-spatial processing; and working memory.

It is often used for early childhood assessment, psycho-educational evaluations, and later career developmental planning.

Differential Ability Scales

This test is designed to evaluate the cognitive abilities and achievements of children from ages 2½-12. The test takes about 45-60 minutes.

There are four different forms in which the test comes in, which are: preschool; school-age; cognitive battery; and school achievement. All of them test for verbal and visual working memory; immediate and delayed memory recall; visual recognition and matching; speed in processing and naming; phonological processing; and conceptualization of basic numbers.

The insights provided by the results are often taken as inputs into the conceptualization of educational solutions that are tailor-made to fix an individual child’s learning problems.

Cognitive Assessment System

This test is designed to evaluate cognitive functioning of those from ages 5-17. There’s the basic version, which takes about 40 minutes; and there’s the standard version, which takes about an hour.

The test seeks to provide assessment by reviewing the four factors of intelligence recognized by the PASS Theory of Intelligence by Das, Kar, and Parrila: planning; attention; simultaneous; and successive.

It is often used for assessment of typical and atypical children, as well as cognitively impaired adults. It has also been used for understanding and assessing learning disabilities—such as autism and ADHD—for the creation of effective intervention methods.

Woodcock-Johnson

This test is designed to assess cognitive abilities of those aged two and above. There’s the standard version, which takes 60-90 minutes; and there’s the extended version, which takes 90-150 minutes.

The Woodcock-Johnson is known for its extensive coverage, evaluating the Cattel-Horn-Carroll theory factors of comprehension-knowledge; long-term memory; visual-spatial thinking; auditory processing; fluid reasoning; processing speed; short-term memory; quantitative knowledge; and reading-writing.

It is often used for testing children’s suitability for ‘gifted’ programs in education, diagnosing learning disabilities, as well as for growth assessments and generic research (the Woodcock-Johnson has been particularly of use in the identifying and documenting of discrepancies between one’s cognitive ability and one’s achievement).

Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test

This test is designed to assess the intelligence and cognitive abilities of those from ages 11-85. There’s the standard version, which takes about 65 minutes; and there’s the extended version, which takes about 90 minutes.

The Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test (KAIT) is designed to measure fluid and crystalized intelligence, as influenced by Horn and Cattell’s Gf-Gc Theory and Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development. It assesses intelligence via the factors of word definitions; auditory comprehension; double meanings; Rebus learning; and logical steps.

It is often used for testing both adolescent and adult intelligence, as well as to provide clinical and neuro-psychological data.

As evidenced from the above information, each IQ test has its own nuanced and specific functions, despite the many areas in which some may overlap. However, have you ever wondered about the general Quality of IQ Tests? If not, you can click here for a full list of related topics to find a more suitable article to meet your information needs.